Home Overview Slideshows Texts More Texts Images Maps In Memoriam
A Glance at Gallipoli The Dardanelles Epic Escape of the Goeben Ship of Remembrance Kampf die Dardanellen Straits Turkish Foreign Policy in WW2 Admiral Keyes Gallipoli Vol 1 Tales of 3 Campaigns The Campaign in Gallipoli The Truth about the Dardanelles Gallipoli Diary
 

 

The Ship of Remembrance


Gallipoli - Salonika



by


Ian Hay


(Pseudonym of Major John H. Beith)


--o--


The Ship of Remembrance

Gallipoli - Salonika


1926



On a bright September afternoon of this year a company nearly three hundred strong, of both sexes and all ages, stood upon the forward deck of a big white liner, straining their eyes across the blue Aegean towards a long brown peninsula, crowned by a not particularly impressive hill. The company were the members of an Empire-wide Pilgrimage, organised by a little society called by the name of St. Barnabas, the son of Consolation, visiting the battlefields and war cemeteries of the eastern Mediterranean. The peninsula was Gallipoli; the near end of it Cape Helles ; and the unimpressive hill was Achi Baba, the key to the whole Dardanelles position—a key, alas, which never quite came into our possession.



To our right lay the mouth of the Straits, with the Asiatic shore, the site of ancient Troy, looming up beyond. Straight ahead certain of the famous landing beaches were visible, each rendered sadly conspicuous by a military cemetery set on the hillside above it. Upon our left, along the receding northern coast of the peninsula, past the rugged projection of Gaba Tepe, we could dimly discern two other landing places, of more than common interest to the Overseas members of our ship's company—Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay . . .